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Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont
2011 - 2012 NEWS

Forward arrow 2012 News Releases

  • News Release, December 4, 2012
    Arsenic Likely in Nearly 40 Percent of New Hampshire's Groundwater

    Nearly 40 percent of New Hampshire's bedrock groundwater likely contains at least low levels of naturally occurring arsenic, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey report. Arsenic levels are largely controlled by bedrock type and by fractures, but are associated with other factors including groundwater chemistry, hydrology, topography, land use and demographics, according to the study done in cooperation with the New Hampshire Departments of Health and Human Services, and Environmental Services.

     

  • News Release, August 14, 2012
    New Flood Mapping Tool Helps Prepare Suncook Area for Future Floods

    A new flood preparedness tool that will help emergency managers improve flood warnings and response is now available for a 16.5-mile reach of the Suncook River in southeastern New Hampshire that has frequently flooded adjacent homes. The new web-based tool, developed by U.S. Geological Survey scientists, shows flood inundation maps to identify where the potential threat of floodwaters is greatest.

     

  • News Release, July 23, 2012
    New Maps for New England

    Nearly 690 revised digital maps covering Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont have been added to approximately 51,000 maps currently covering the lower 48 states and are available for free download from the website.


  • News Release, June 25, 2012
    Study Confirms Presence of Contaminants in Some New England Bedrock Groundwater, ID's New Concerns, Determines Likely Locations

    PEMBROKE, NH – Potentially harmful levels of naturally occurring arsenic, uranium, radium, radon and manganese have been found in some bedrock groundwater that supplies drinking water wells in New England, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.


  • News Release, April 11, 2012
    New Geologic Map of Vermont Unveiled

    MONTPELIER, Vt. – A new bedrock geologic map of the state was unveiled in a ceremony at the Vermont State House today, bringing a critical tool to land managers involved in natural resource planning and environmental assessment.


OTHER 2012 NEWS

  • NEW WEB PAGE (4/20/2012):
    New Hampshire and Vermont Drought Watch (maps and information from USGS Drought Watch)

  • EVENT: Friday, March 23, 2012, at Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH
    2012 NH Water and Watershed Conference

    This is a one day conference for scientists, educators, students, volunteers, consultants, planners, and researchers alike. Check out the Conference Website at: http://www.plymouth.edu/center-for-the-environment/2012-nh-water-watershed-conference/ for more details, the agenda and registration..

  • 2/21/2012
    Funding Secured for USGS Lake Champlain Streamflow and Lake Level Gages

    Data collection at 19 streamflow and lake-levels gages in the Lake Champlain Basin will continue until September 30, 2012 due to a combination of funding from the Lake Champlain Basin Program and the USGS. This funding averts a planned shutdown of the gages (see other 2011 news) that was scheduled for March 1.

    Those with questions concerning the continued operation of these streamgages should contact Keith Robinson of the USGS New Hampshire-Vermont Office at 603-226-7807 or dc_nh@usgs.gov.

Forward arrow 2011 News Releases

  • News Release, September 6, 2011
    New Science to Help Direct Action on Excessive Nutrients in Rivers and Estuaries

    New USGS findings released in the Journal of the American Water Resources Association are accessible at: http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/sparrow/mrb/

    New Science to Help Water Managers Target Areas to Improve Water Quality—New SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were developed for seven major regions of the conterminous U.S. Regional total phosphorus and total nitrogen models were developed for six regions: New England and Mid-Atlantic; South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee; Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy; Missouri; Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red and Texas Gulf; and Pacific Northwest. A dissolved solids model was developed for the arid southwest.

    These models confirm the importance of urban and agricultural sources as major contributors of nutrients to streams, but provide new information about local and regional differences in nutrient contributions from contrasting types of agricultural (farm fertilizers vs. animal manure) and urban (wastewater vs diffuse runoff from developed land) sources. In some locations, diffuse background sources are a dominant source of nutrients to streams. Information on background sources is often difficult to quantify in local water-quality assessments, yet is needed to develop comprehensive and realistic management goals.

    An online, interactive decision support system provides easy access to these newly-developed regional models describing how rivers receive and transport nutrients from natural and human sources to sensitive waters, such as the Gulf of Mexico. In the arid southwest, the system can be used to delineate sources and transport of dissolved solids.



OTHER 2011 NEWS

  • UPDATED 8/30/2011 (first posted 5/25/2011):
    Status of USGS Lake Champlain Hydrologic Data Collection and Studies
Data collection at multiple streamgages in the Lake Champlain Basin will continue until September 30, 2011, but may be discontinued after that date due to a lack of funding for the operation and maintenance of the streamgages. For a complete list of these threatened streamgages, see our real-time water data page. USGS continues to have discussions with our partners and cooperators in Vermont to find funding for the streamgages. USGS hydrologic investigations studying how water-quality conditions are changing in major tributaries to Lake Champlain, and the effectiveness of non-point source controls in the Englesby Brook watershed in Burlington VT, may also be affected.
Questions concerning the continued operation of these streamgages and studies may be directed to Keith Robinson of the USGS New Hampshire-Vermont Office at 603-226-7807 or dc_nh@usgs.gov.

  • February 15, 2011 Notice:
    USGS Lake Champlain Hydrologic Data Collection and Studies
Data collection at multiple streamgages in the Lake Champlain Basin may be discontinued in the near future due to funding reductions. For a complete list of threatened streamgages, see our real-time water data page. Although historic data will remain accessible, no new data will be collected unless one or more new funding partners are found. USGS hydrologic investigations studying how water-quality conditions are changing in major tributaries to Lake Champlain, and the effectiveness of non-point source controls in the Englesby Brook watershed in Burlington VT, may also be discontinued.
Users who are willing to contribute funding to continue operation of these streamgages and studies should contact Keith Robinson of the USGS New Hampshire-Vermont Office at (603-226-7807 or dc_nh@usgs.gov).

 


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